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Mum in Makeup By Victoria Davies @Muminmakeup

Mum in Makeup By Victoria Davies @Muminmakeup

I have always been one of those women who cannot leave the house without mascara. Not a permanently high-maintenence, full-face-of-slap kind of a girl, but someone for whom a little bit goes a long way. The love affair began at school, looking with envy at the girls who wore make-up and flouted the rules. I've always had translucent, Tilda Swinton-style eyelashes. Unlike the great Ms Swinton, however, I refused to embrace them. I was desperate for gorgeous, long, thick Bambi lashes. I can remember sneaking into my parents' en suite to raid Mum's make-up bag. I'd bypass the frosted 90s lipsticks and go straight for the brown mascara (which, as far as I know, Mum switched long ago to black). I loved the definition it gave to my eyes, the hint of glamour and the grown-up world to come. 

 The problem was, you see, that I was a Good Girl. My school didn't allow any make-up, not even a hint, let alone the full orange faces so many of the girls in my year sported. I had watched them all being called out at the end of assembly and shamed for their Jezebel-like behaviour, and vowed that would never be me. So I contented myself with the entirely useless trio of clear mascara (I mean, why), light dusting of powder on my spotty face (like throwing a cup of water on a raging inferno) and Boots vanilla flavoured lip balm (smelled amazing, did nothing).

 All of this meant that when I finally reached the heady land of Sixth Form I was ready to develop my relationship with cosmetics. The perfect Shirley Manson-from-Garbage kohl-ed eye. The Rose-from-Titanic lip. The flawless skin out of a bottle I had always craved. I could wax lyrical about each part of the puzzle, every product and why it makes everything feel better. Make-up is one of the loves of my life, but I had genuinely never realised how much I needed it in my life until I became pregnant. 

 I had the worst pregnancy. The absolute worst. Suffering from Hyperemesis Gravidarum (yes, like Kate Middleton only for the whole nine months), I could barely lift my head off the pillow most days. For six months I was in and out of hospital. Fluids, needles, vomiting until there was nothing but blood. It was truly awful, and I lost myself. It wasn't until my parents took over and moved me back up North to be cared for that I could see any kind of light at the end of the tunnel. That was when I began to wear make-up again. 

 It was like finding myself. I could look in the mirror at a woman I recognised as me again. I applied it lovingly, every day, in a sort of ritual. Foundation, eyeliner, mascara, bright lips. Make-up gave me a boost when I needed it most. I'm sure that towards the end of pregnancy most women are buying beautiful baby clothes and dreaming about their child. I still couldn't get past the end of each day, so buying a gorgeous new Clinique matte lipstick was enough for me. 

 Fast-forward to a week after the birth. I had done the staying in pajamas all day thing maybe once or twice, but it wasn't for me. I started to approach parenthood like a job. Up at 7.30 for a shower whilst my husband and baby still slumbered. Outfit on, full face of slap. It's another ritual, albeit an incredibly fast one, a race against my son who'll be waking up for a feed any moment. I can do the whole thing in seven minutes, start to finish. It's amazing; there really should be a medal for it.

Strangely, no matter how bad the night, or how little sleep, a shower, proper outfit even if just leggings and a tee, and that all-important skincare and make-up routine makes me feel polished. Makes me normal. Makes me me. What's more, somehow I feel more able to cope. Make-up is my armour, my war-paint, my shield. And here's the really strange part: It makes me feel like a better mother.

I know there are people who think that a reliance on make-up has more to do with men than women. A symbol of the patriarchy, of how women feel they have to look to meet society's beauty standards. This has been discussed elsewhere and shot down by far better writers and beauty officionados than I. It may well be that way for some; but for me it has nothing to do with it. 

It just makes me happy, and who doesn't need that? 

 

www.muminmakeup.wordpress.com/

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